PUBLIC SAFETY POWER SHUtOFFS:

HOW SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON MAKES DECISIONS

The decision to shut off power during Public Safety Power Shutoffs is based on information from fire scientists, meteorologists, and crews in the field.

Factsheet

Southern California Edison considers the need for Public Safety Power Shutoffs when weather and fire experts forecast dangerous conditions, including strong winds, very dry vegetation and low humidity. Combined, these create the risk that flying debris or other damage to wires and equipment could cause a fire with the potential to spread rapidly and threaten communities.

Click for Fact Sheet

Even as we continue to harden our grid, and to make our infrastructure more resilient against fiercer winds, ongoing climate change impacts including California’s unprecedented drought, means a spark from incidents such as windblown debris hitting our lines could set off a significant wildfire. Turning off power in extreme winds remains our tool of last resort to keep customers and communities safe.

Shinjini C. Menon, SCE Vice President
EOC and Situational Awareness Center

PSPS decisions are based on quantitative analyses while accounting for qualitative factors, such as societal and emergency management impacts. This technical paper provides in-depth information and analysis regarding PSPS decision-making factors and their implementation during dangerous wildfire conditions.

Click for Technical Paper

SCE Installs Covered Conductors in Wildomar District

In 2021, SCE made significant progress in expediting grid hardening work to reduce the need for PSPS on circuits that experienced four or more PSPS shutoffs between 2019 and January 2021.

With work completed last year, the company estimates that customers on the most frequently impacted circuits experienced more than a 70% reduction in total PSPS outage time based on 2021 weather and fuel conditions.

To continue reducing these outages, SCE will harden more than 50 circuits in 2022. In addition, SCE will be making further enhancements to 11 of the hardened circuits last year.

View Frequently Impacted Circuits


UPDATED: Sept. 22, 2022